A PLAY BY LIVIU MONSTED

Shown at  The Chippen Street Theatre

SEPTEMBER 2018

25,26,27,28

DIRECTED BY LIVIU MONSTED

PRODUCED BY ABE BASTOLI & LIVIU MONSTED

A hard-hitting, confronting commentary on homelessness, social responsibility and the harsh reality of living on the street.

 

The acclaimed 2017 show; STREET is back at The Sydney Fringe with 10% of the box office going towards Youth Off The Streets.

STREET is a harsh and revealing look into the lives of two young people trying to survive on the streets day to day.

For Foster and Miriam, being alone and unseen is the norm, that is, until they're unexpectedly confronted by two people who are seemingly new to the cruel reality of living on the street.

 

 

 

CAST

Hunter Clarke

Manning

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Talia Chenaye

Fay

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Benn Spillane

Christian

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Lucy Hadfield

Miriam

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Stuart Oliver

Foster

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Lighting Design: Kodie Amos

Poster Design: Abe Bastoli

"Writer and director Liviu Monsted presents to the audience a grim picture of the plight of young people living on the street. It is not so much a story of why or how they ended up homeless, nor does it present a neat solution to their situation, rather it raises our consciousness and asks us to look more closely at those living on the streets."

- Stage Whispers

“As the performance progresses, you can see into the cruel, atrocious world where human beings are fighting each day for survival. The play put this into perspective on how society "forgets" and "neglects" the homeless, as many of us do not know their stories, their struggles, their demons.

The play hits you hard and showcases deep emotions, thankfully, there are moments of humour which lightens the mood.

The cast did a fantastic job and executed the performance brilliantly.” -
Weekend Notes

"Hadfield gives a heartfelt performance as a young Miriam seemingly beaten into a timid and self-conscious personality. Against Chenaye’s brash and upright outlook, Hadfield is heartbreakingly vulnerable.

 

Monsted’s direction strings out the events of the two nights into a mundane boredom representative of the limbo-esque position Miriam and Foster occupy. While the actors perform with a sense of compassion, there is slim opportunity to break through their hardened exteriors. Brief glimpses of a gentle humanity must suffice rather than a deep-dive into personal exposure, further emphasising the other ways in which the characters are exposed."                       - Night Writes.